Citizen

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Civil Rights connected to government? Pure Republics dependent on faith, hope and charity compared to the governments of Cain, Nimrod, Pharaoh, Saul, Caesar and others., SSSeries 2-10 5:00

The Bible talks about rights all the time. Rights can be one of two kinds "a moral or legal entitlement to have or obtain something or to act in a certain way."

God gave man dominion which is the right to choose to exercise authority including to dress it and keep it. That allegiance to God includes an allegiance to the land He gave us to both dress and keep it. But that authority was not over other men.

Even Romans 13 is talking about the higher right to choose.

Many places in the Bible you see the Greek word exousia. It is referring to the right to choose... and even translated right and liberty meaning the power to choose.

In Philippians 3:20 we are told "For our conversation is in heaven; from whence also we look for the Saviour, the Lord Jesus Christ:"

The word "conversation" is from the Greek word politeuma [1] meaning "the administration of civil affairs" derived from the word polites[2] meaning "citizen".

As far as civil rights there are also two kinds.

  1. Civil rights are such as belong to every citizen of the state or country, or, in a wider sense to all its inhabitants, and are not connected with the organization or the administration of government. They include the rights of property, marriage, protection by laws, freedom of contract, trial by jury, etc.” [3]
  2. An individual, who becomes a member or person in a political society, also has civil rights, but the origin of those rights, being political, are rights “pertaining or relating to the policy or administration of government.” [4] So, “as otherwise defined, civil rights are rights appertaining to a person in virtue of his citizenship in a state or community. Rights capable of being enforced or redressed in civil action. Also a term applied to certain rights secured to citizens of the United States by the thirteenth and fourteenth amendments to the Constitution, and by various acts of Congress made in pursuance thereof.” [5]

The reason Christ appointed the kingdom to His little flock and commanded them to make the people sit down in the Tens was so that their "conversation" could be in the Kingdom of heaven.

Chapter 3. of the book The Covenants of the gods
Citizenship vs Citizenship
http://www.hisholychurch.org/study/gods/cog3cvc.php

Audio http://keysofthekingdom.info/COG-03.mp3

Citizen vs Citizen from the book "The Covenants of the gods"
Citizens of the world and in the world?
http://www.hisholychurch.org/study/bklt/citizen.pdf
Printable 5" X 8 1/2" Pamphlets, or http://www.hisholychurch.org/study/bklt/citizenst.pdf
Standard 8 1/2"X 11" Print Friendly


Democracy, SSSeries 5-10 4:12


There were different types of citizens in the original republic. There were freeman who were free from most civil authority unless he entered into relationship with those authorities or institutions who depended upon them for their existence. They were religiously allowed to accept or reject God as his King. The word “[[Republic|republic]” was used because those early pilgrims and separatists knew its origins. It is a shortened form of the Latin idiom “Libera res Publica”, meaning “free from things public.” The heads of the government were “titular” in authority, meaning that they held authority “in name only.” In an indirect democracy, the mob elects those that govern the whole and even make laws for the individual who is subject to them, while, in the republic, you only elected representatives with a limited authority.

Republics SSSeries 6-10 8:01
Not My Tea Party, SS Video Series 4-10 7:11

“Before the Norman conquest of England in 1066, the people were the fountainhead of justice. The Angloe-Saxon courts were composed of large numbers of freemen and the law which they administered, was that which had been handed down by oral tradition from generation to generation. In competition with these popular, nonprofessional courts the Norman king, who insisted that he was the fountainhead of justice, set up his own tribunals… The angloe-Saxon tribunals had been open to all; every freeman could appeal to them for justice.”[6]

Was Paul a Roman?
Was Paul a Roman Citizen or was he Free?
http://www.hisholychurch.org/sermon/paulroman.php

Civil Rights, SS Video Series 2-10 5:00
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Isf7LjQTcOQ

Sovereign States, SS Video Series 3-10 5:12
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HW5P_qSsq3g

Not My Tea Party, SS Video Series 4-10 7:11
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pQKDrx9KQ0k


Benefactors | Fathers | Conscripted fathers | Pater Patriae‎ | Patronus |
Rome vs US | Gods | Imperial Cult of Rome | Apotheos | Supreme being |
Corvee | Employ | Corban | Christian conflict | Merchandise | Bondage |
Citizen | Protection | Birth registration | Mark of the Beast | Undocumented |
Religion | Public religion | Pure Religion | False religion | Cult | Tesserae |
Covetous Practices | If I were the devil | Biting one another | Cry out

In the book The Covenants of the gods we examine the idea of types of citizen in the world and of the world.



== Footnotes ==
  1. 4175 ~πολίτευμα~ politeuma \@pol-it’-yoo-mah\@ from 4176; n n AV-conversation 1; 1
    1) the administration of civil affairs or of a commonwealth
    2) the constitution of a commonwealth, form of government and the laws by which it is administered
    3) a state, commonwealth 3a) the commonwealth of citizens
  2. 4177 ~πολίτης~ polites \@pol-ee’-tace\@ from 4172; n m AV-citizen 3; 3
    1) a citizen
    1a) the inhabitant of any city or country
    1b) the association of another in citizenship
    1b1) a fellow citizen, fellow countryman
  3. Right. In Constitutional Law. Black’s 3rd p. 1559.
  4. Political. Black’s 3rd p. 1375.
  5. Right. In Constitutional Law. Black’s 3rd p. 1559.
  6. Clark’s Summary of American law. Common Law Chat 1 pp.530.

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